MEDICAL AUTOMATION EXPERTS


Terry Sharrer's bio:

Dr. Sharrer began as Executive Director, Medical Innovation and Transformation Institute, with the Inova Health System (Fairfax, VA) in July 2007. Formerly, he was the Curator of Health Sciences at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, where he had worked for thirty-six years.

Terry Sharrer speaks and writes about a range of life science subjects. In 1987, he co-organized an exhibition titled "The Search for Life: Genetic Technology in the 20th Century." This show also was the inaugural exhibition for the DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. He has done video documentaries on the Human Genome Project, the beginning of gene therapy, and the molecular biology of cancer. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Maryland, has authored some three dozen publications-including A Kind of Fate, Agricultural Change in Virginia, 1861-1920 (about the biological consequences of the Civil War and the beginning of germ theory practices, Iowa State University Press, 2000)-and currently is writing a history of molecular medicine. For outreach work, has served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Foundation for Cancer Research (Bethesda, MD), board member of the Carilion Biomedical Institute (Roanoke, VA), board member, Immune Deficiency Foundation (Towson, MD), and board member, Inova Fairfax Hospital Cancer Advisory Committee (Fairfax, VA).

Currently, his public service includes: board member of the Fund for Inherited Disease Research (Bryn Mawr, PA); and Science Advisor, for the Loudoun County, VA Department of Economic Development, the Clarke County VA Education Foundation, and the Arizona Science Alliance. With his wife Patty, and sons Alex, age 13, and Nicholas, age 17, he lives in Hamilton, Loudoun County, VA.

Disclosure: G. Terry Sharrer, PhD has stock dividends in Merck and Pfizer.

Terry Sharrer's posts:

Nano Magnets for Thawing Frozen Tissues

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

It has long been known that freezing tissues, such as arteries, extends their “shelf life” for transplantation, but problems arise [MORE]

A Nasal Swab to Detect Lung Cancer

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Nasal Swab
For persistent smokers, their “airway field of injury” extends all the way from their bronchial epithelium to the cells [MORE]

Three-in-One Fiber Offers Options for Brain Devices

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

MIT Multifunction Fibe
With a new thin-as-a-human-hair flexible fiber, MIT engineers were able to deliver optical, electrical and chemical signaling to [MORE]

Drug Releasing Implant that is Magnetically Triggered

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Month by month, it seems, bioengineers are finding increasingly clever means for controlling drug release with implanted devices. This piece [MORE]

Propelling Nanorobots by Enzyme Action or Ultrasound

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Dr. Sámuel Sánchez Nanorobot Researcher
Injectable robots—sometimes called microswimmers—raise two sorts of engineering problems: design of the device itself, and its [MORE]

Imaging that Distinguishes Dementia from Depression

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Brain SPECT Scans
Single proton emission computed tomography (SPECT) relies on injected gamma ray-emitting radioisotopes which results in true 3-D images [MORE]

A 3-D Printed “Eagle Eye” Lens

April 25, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Eagle Eye
Camera innovations that support driverless cars and flying surveillance drones might also be used to have better vision from [MORE]

Genomics Using DNA Storage and Retrieval

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

DNA
Computer scientists have long marveled at DNA’s information storage capacity, and consequently have imagined how DNA itself might be used [MORE]

Growing Mouse Embryos from Stem Cells

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Mouse
For the first time, researchers at the University of Cambridge have created mouse embryo from stem cells in the lab. [MORE]

“Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot”

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Robotic Surgery
In soft tissue surgery, the tissue can deform or become covered in blood obscuring what the surgeon is doing. [MORE]

Nanoparticle-Enabled Gene Editing

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

CRISPR Delivery Mechanism
Getting CRISPR-Cas 9 molecules to their target cells without damage or off-targeting has been an obstacle for gene [MORE]

Salt Coating on Surgical Masks Inhibits Virus

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Surgical Mask
It has been 99 years since the Great Influenza pandemic at the end of World War I. Old pictures [MORE]

Nanofiber Matrix for Culturing Human Stem Cells

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Three Dimensional Stem Cell Growth
Most tissue culturing of pluripotent stem cells is done in petri dishes which distorts the shape [MORE]

Nanoelectronic “Thread” for Brain Probes

April 18, 2017 | | Posted in Newsletter

Neural Network
Biomechanical engineers at the University of Texas-Austin have made nanoelectronic thread for inserting probes into the brain. According to [MORE]